History of Day of the Dead and the Sugar Skull Tradition.

The wonderful and most fascinating celebration of the Day of the Dead takes place in central and southern Mexico on the 1st and 2nd of November and is an ancient tradition of celebrating loved ones who have passed away. The indigenous people believe that the gates of heaven are opened at midnight on October 31, and the spirits of all deceased children (angelitos) are allowed to reunite with their families for 24 hours. On November 2nd, the spirits of the adults come down to enjoy the festivities that are prepared for them.  After families clean off and decorate the graves of their loved ones, they stay up all night telling funny stories about those who have passed and socialise with one another.

Assured that the dead would be insulted by mourning or sadness, Dia de los Muertos celebrates the lives of the deceased with food, drink, parties, and activities the dead enjoyed in life. Dia de los Muertos recognizes death as a natural part of the human experience, a continuum with birth, childhood, and growing up to become a contributing member of the community. On Dia de los Muertos, the dead are also a part of the community, awakened from their eternal sleep to share celebrations with their loved ones.

The most familiar symbol of Dia de los Muertos may be the calacas and calaveras (skeletons and skulls), which appear everywhere during the holiday: in candied sweets, as parade masks, as dolls.Calacas and calaveras are almost always portrayed as enjoying life, often in fancy clothes and entertaining situations.

Day of the Dead

This woman artisan is busy decorating her home with candles, copal (aromatic resin), fruits, cempasuchil (wild marigolds), and saint’s images. Later, when the home cooking is done, she’ll bring big plates of food to offer to the spirits of her returning loved ones!

 

Day of the Dead

In some areas, people dance around with shells attached to their clothing. The noise of the shells hitting each other is believed to wake the spirits up.

 

Day of the Dead

Marigold is the important flower used in celebrating the Day of the Dead in Oaxaca and throughout Mexico.
In the remote villages, the people use a wild version of the Marigold. It flowers in October and is plentiful in the fields.
In Oaxaca the indigenous people call the flower Cempasuchitl in the Nahuatl language (Aztec)
The Spanish name for the flower, Flor de muerto, means flower of death.

Day of the Dead

One popular tradition is to make colourful candy made skulls out of sugar. Often they are decorated with the names of the deceased on the forehead of the skull.

 

We love the Day of the Dead traditions, festivities, and everything it stands for, and thought we would incorporate the iconic sugar skulls into our collection. Although we do not sell directly to the public, we do have fantastic retailers worldwide. If you would like some help finding your local Banned Apparel retailer please feel free to contact us; info@bannedapparel.co.uk

 

Day of the Dead

Sugar Skull Cherries Handbag and Purse.

 

Sugar Skull Wedges and Purse. Photo // Our Stockist www.Belldandy.fr

Sugar Skull Wedges and Purse.
     Photo // Our Stockist www.Belldandy.fr

 

Day of the Dead

Sugar Skull Cat Cardigan.

 

Day of the Dead

Sugar Skull Purse.