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Our Footwear Designer

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Banned Apparel Footwear Designer
Here, at Banned Apparel headquarters, we are fortunate to have some of the most talented artists and designers who are dedicated in delivering to you the most beautiful fashion, footwear and accessories. Our footwear has always been a huge hit with our customers and so we only thought it right to find out more about our incredibly talented footwear designer; Ybo Vass.
Ybo Vass

Ybo Vass

Banned Apparel
Footwear and Accessories Head of Design

Hi Ybo, can you tell our readers a little about yourself?

I was born in Transylvania, Romania from Hungarian parents, luckily in a town almost dominated by arts, painters, musicians, instruments , footwear and our local beer; the perfect setup for an aspiring artist!  I was painting and drawing since a very early age, but somehow my passion wasn’t at it’s peak yet. I took a dip in fashion design,  and felt the opportunities were so vast and challenging. I believe I had always a particular appreciation for accessories. The calling to design thousands of patterns, shapes, ideas on such limited surface.

Why did you decide to become a fashion designer and, in particular, a vintage fashion designer?
I feel lucky enough to have had the chance to get a break as a luxury footwear designer from ceramic design and persevere my calling. I had the chance to experience the hard journey from designing to production, but certainly did not lack it’s joy and success ! I knew if I truly believe in what I do it can take me far. My designer journey started in Bucharest and has taken me as far as London. I’m proud to say I achieved my goals , but there’s always room to dream bigger! 
 
What motivates you as a fashion designer?
As a designer I’m submitted to my calling, if I have a dream at night, I must make sure I fill my sketchbook on my beside table right away . I get inspiration from everything. Colours, shapes simply excite me!
 
What is your favourite part about being a fashion designer?

I’m thrilled to work with embroideries, different type of materials, a wide range of colours, unexpected contrast all fused in happy moods.

If you could pin point just one of your favourite pieces which one would it be and why?
One of my favourite styles are the Mary Jane’s, I think they are timeless, the perfect shape that compliment every woman.
What upcoming trends do you predict in the vintage fashion scene?

My predictions in the area I design could be endless, but every style is unique . It would be wrong to define only one, every shoe is beautiful as long as it makes the one who wears it feel unique.

 
Who are your style icons?

I would call my grandmother my style icon, she used to be a tailor, seamstress, and she was truly graceful. She used to be the true image of the 40’s, 50’s even in the 90’s . Her elegance was not only defined by what she wore but by her gestures and her poise.

 
If you could travel back to any era, which one would it be and why?

If I had the chance to travel back in time I would go back exactly 125 years to 1892! How amazing would that be !

 

Beautiful footwear designs by our very own Ybo Vass

Footwear Designer

Footwear Designer

Footwear Designer

Above are just some of our new season footwear designed by Ybo and available from ModCloth

Footwear Designer

Ybo created these beautiful court shoes with fabulous glitter heels. Needless to say they have been a huge hit!

Christmas Outfit Ideas

by Lizzy 0 Comments

Christmas Outfit Ideas

Are you planning your Christmas wardrobe? Whether you are looking for something beautiful and elegant or cosy and snuggly our worldwide Banned Apparel retailers will have something for your Christmas festivities.

Our new season pieces cater for many tastes; from our vintage classics to something a little darker with a festive twist. Our AW16 collection features beautiful swing skirts, such as our Vanity print and Winter scene seen below, with beautiful, bold artwork which would look great with cute heels or boots.

Banned Apparel do not sell directly to the public but we do have the most wonderful collection of retailers worldwide who will be happy to help you in your search. To find your nearest retailer simply use your search engine.

Our Vanity Skirt available from Top Vintage boutique

Our Vanity Skirt available from Top Vintage boutique

Christmas

Our Winter scene skirt available from Bohemian Finds.

 

Christmas

Red Knit Cardigan with faux fur trim.

Christmas

Skeleton Knit Jumper

Christmas

Skulls Rose Knit Jumper

Our cardigan and jumper with a festive twist.

No outfit is complete without a beautiful pair of shoes. Why not add a touch of sparkle to your festive wardrobe with our glitter heel Mary Jane’s.

 

Christmas

Our glitter heeld Mary Jane’s available from Belldandy

 

Christmas

Check with your Banned Apparel retailer for stock of our shoes, handbags and apparel to compliment your Christmas outfit.

 

Looking for more Banned Apparel stockists? We have listed just a handful of our retailers below who carry a wide range of our products.

Attitude Clothing

The Gothic Shop

Twisted Alice

Beserk

Angel Clothing

Blue Banana

History of the Petticoat

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History of the Petticoat

The petticoat, petycote (probably derived from the Old French petite cote, “little coat”) appeared in literature in the 15th century in reference to a kind of padded waistcoat, or undercoat, worn for warmth over the shirt by men. The petticoat developed as a piece of women’s apparel, a skirt worn under an over gown, at the end of the Middle Ages. By the beginning of the 16th century, the over gown had an inverted V opening, and the petticoat, now visible, was brocaded or embroidered.

In the 17th century the outer skirt was looped up prominently, showing the petticoat underneath, and in the 18th century the petticoat figured prominently with the inverted V opening of the popular polonaise. In the early 19th century, women wore many petticoats, bound together, to show the great fullness of the skirt. The most popular type of stiffened petticoat was made out of horsehair and linen which earned it the name crinoline (‘crin’ is the French for horsehair and ‘lin’ the linen thread it was woven with). Worn by high class women of leisure as well as factory workers and maidservants, the crinoline wasn’t always the most practical of undergarments, with a tendency to get caught in machinery, wheel-spokes and wind; or to rather explosively take flame! Thousands of autopsies during the mid 19th century were signed… ‘death by crinoline’.

In 1856 horsehair and whalebone were replaced by a light frame of metal spring hoops; these were used to create volume underneath the hop skirts favoured by fashionable women. At their height, crinolines would expand the skirts of the wearer by up to 6 yards (18 feet!) at the widest point, though they began to diminish in size until in the 1870’s they were replaced by the smaller crinolette and then later, the bustle.

History of the petticoat

History of the petticoat

During WW1 the crinoline was revived in the form of full mid-calf length skirts with layered petticoats. It was considered patriotic to dress your best for men returning from war.  The fashion continued through the 1920’s and, in the 1930’s, just before WW2, the hooped skirt returned. Queen Elizabeth really brought the fashion back. The bell shaped, mid calf crinoline was her nighttime and daytime look.

In the late 1920’s, chiffon dresses with several sheer petticoats became fashionable. With the Great Depression in the 1930s, narrow skirts returned and petticoats again were unpopular until the end of the decade when revived for some evening, prom, and wedding gowns. World War II, with its rationing and general shortage of materials, brought an end to petticoats.

Petticoats were revived by Christian Dior in his full-skirted New Look of 1947 and tiered, ruffled petticoats remained extremely popular during the 1950’s, especially with teenage girls.

Here, at Banned Apparel, we are huge fans of petticoats ( in case you couldn’t have guessed ) and we have a huge range of the loveliest, fluffiest styles in varying lengths and colours. Our petticoats are suitable for a wide range of subcultures including Rockabilly, Psychobilly, Lolita, Gothic, Victorian, Vintage and Steampunk.

 

 

history of the petticoat

Our full and fluffy petticoats come in a rainbow of colours.

 

history of the petticoat

Banned Apparel Petticoats

 


 


Contact your local Banned Apparel retailer for availability of our petticoats and other pieces from our full collection.

For all other enquiries please contact us at; info@bannedapparel.co.uk

 

Halloween Outfit

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Halloween Outfit Inspiration.

 

BANNED Halloween Outfit

BANNED Halloween Outfit

There are less than two weeks to go until, what many would consider to be, the best season ever; Halloween(!), a time for many of us grown ups to play dress up and channel our inner Wednesday Addams.

Have you got your Halloween outfit sorted? Don’t worry if you are still unsure, we have got the perfect collection waiting for you through our retailers worldwide. From dark and deadly, to romantic renaissance, our suppliers will have something to suit your Halloween outfit requirements. Our range of beautifully made clothing, footwear, apparel and accessories can be found through our Banned Apparel stockists from Australia and New Zealand to America, Canada and Europe.

We have listed just a handful of retailers below but, if you use your search engine, you will be able to find lots more  of our suppliers around the globe.

 

Halloween by AttitudeClothing

Halloween by AttitudeClothing

 

Halloween Outfit

Our Batting Eyelids Top. Available from Modern Millie.

 

Halloween by BlueBanana

Halloween by BlueBanana

 

Halloween Outfit by RebelCircus

Halloween Outfit by RebelCircus

 

Halloween Outfit

Our Haunted Dress (apron not included. Available from Borderline Plus.

Halloween Proposal by TragicBeautiful

Halloween Proposal by TragicBeautiful

 

Halloween by RockCollection

Halloween by RockCollection

Halloween by Beserk

Halloween by Beserk

 

 

Halloween Beauty Inspiration

No Halloween outfit is complete without the perfect hair, makeup and nails! Whether you are going for something subtle or full-on spooky these will give you lots of inspiration.


 

Halloween Outfit

Fila de Knox and her perfect, two tone locks.

 

Halloween Outfit

Beautifully haunting bat lips of The Malificent

 

Halloween Outfit

Lunar Nails by NailsbyBreee

 


 

If you have any questions regarding our products or retailers please feel free to contact us; info@bannedapparel.co.uk

History of Halloween

Falling between Autumn and Winter, History of Halloween ( All Hallows Eve, Al Hallows Evening ) is a celebration of superstition with costumes, gatherings and lots of sweet treats!

history of halloween graphics

Halloween

It began as the festival of Samhain and was part of the ancient Celtic religion in Britain and other parts of Europe. At the end of summer it was thought that the barrier between our world and the world of ghosts and spirits thinned. This enabled weird creatures with strange powers to wander about on Earth. The Celts would light bonfires and wear costumes to ward off roaming ghosts.

The Celts, who lived 2,000 years ago in the area that is now Ireland, the United Kingdom and northern France, celebrated their new year on November 1. This day marked the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the dark, cold winter, a time of year that was often associated with human death.

 Pope Gregory III designated November 1 as a time to honour all saints and martyrs. The holiday, All Saints’ Day, incorporated some of the traditions of Samhain. The evening before was known as All Hallows’ Eve and later Halloween. Over time, this evolved into a community-based event characterised by child-friendly activities such as trick-or-treating.


History of Halloween

History of Halloween Costumes worn to ward off the interest of ghosts and spirits.

Hair and Makeup of the 1960s

Hair and Makeup of the 1960s

Hair and Makeup of the 1960s varied considerably; from the au naturel look of the Hippies to the bright and bold statement style of the Mod movement. Here we take a look at the influences behind the hair and makeup of the 1960s and how you can apply them to your everyday style.

hair and makeup of the 1960s

1960s Makeup

It was the youth who had the biggest influence on the hair and makeup of the 1960s. Since the 1950s they had  disposable incomes ready to spend on looking fabulous! Women’s 1960s makeup began quite demurely with pastels and nudes that enhanced their natural beauty and was often seen on trend setters such as Jacqueline Kennedy. Glamorous, bouffant hair and pillbox hats often accompanied this natural look.

hair and makeup of the 1960s

Jacqueline Kennedy’s early 1960s pastel makeup.

On the other side of the spectrum, and originating from London, was the more edgy, rebellious style of the Mod subculture. The demure look didn’t suit everyone and many girls favoured the Mod style immortalised by Twiggy; short hair, lashings of mascara and plenty of eye shadow! It was the eyes which were at the heart of 1960’s makeup.

To create this look, a bold white, blue or grey eye shadow would usually be applied to the lid and a dramatic cut crease was created by applying a dark eyes shadow or pencil liner along the crease of the eye.

Reigning supreme was thick, black liquid eyeliner on the lid while white pencil was used on the waterline to open up the eyes. Huge pairs of doll-like false lashes often followed. This was taken even further by Twiggy who used liquid liner to draw in individual lower lashes for a surreal effect. Plenty of mascara completed this look.

Hair and makeup of the 1960s

Twiggy applying Mod-style makeup.

Lips took a backseat in the 1960s. They were kept pale and some women even applied foundation over their lips to help them blend in with the rest of the face! Those who did wear lipstick stuck to colours that wouldn’t take the focus away from their eyes, such as pale pinks, corals and very subtle reds. However, daring Mods could sometimes be seen sporting white lipstick.

 

1960s Hair

It was Jacqueline Kennedy, America’s First Lady, who gave the 1960’s bouffant hair it’s iconic status. It was thought to be the perfect style as it always looked so glamorous and women all over the world would be seen with this big, fabulous hair.

hair and makeup of the 1960s Banned Apparel

Jacqueline Kennedy’s Bouffant hair.

 

From 1964 onward the younger generation added their own twist to the bouffant hair which is known as the Beehive.

The Beehive is an enduring symbol of the 60s. This glamorous up do was the most popular hair style and was often seen on celebrities such as Audrey Hepburn, Dusty Springfield and Bridgette Bardot who wore a half up, half down Beehive. This hair style wasn’t easy to achieve and required a lot of styling. At night before bed, girls would set their hair in very large rollers using a gel solution to achieve the sky-high hair this look called for. Some girls with extremely curly hair would use old grapefruit cans instead of rollers to set their locks.

Har and makeup of the 1960s Banned Apparel

The girl group, The Ronettes and their Beehive hair.

 

Hair and makeup of the 1960s Banned Apparel

Bridgette Bardot’s half up, half down Beehive.

Banned Apparel 1960s Collection.

For this AW16 Banned Apparel have introduced clothing, footwear and accessories from the 1960s. These have recently been on show at our recent trade shows and will be available at your nearest Banned Apparel retailer very shortly.

Hair and Makeup of the 1960s Banned Apparel

AW16 Banned Apparel 1960s Collection.

In the meantime, if you have any questions please feel free to contact us; info@bannedapparel.co.uk

 

Swinging Sixties

It’s that time of year again, trade show season, and many of you may have already noticed that we have been travelling far and wide showcasing our upcoming collection. You may also have noticed that we have included some beautiful vintage pieces from yet another era; The Swinging Sixties!

 

swinging sixties

Banned Apparel at the recent CIFF Trade Show,  Copenhagen.

 

Singing Sixties

Banned Apparel launching new range at MODA, NEC, Birmingham.

 

The ‘Swinging Sixties’ decade was ten years full of fun, frolics and attitude. The clean, conservative very elegant style of early 60’s icon, Jackie Kennedy, whom would often be seen in knee length dresses was quickly replaced by Brigitte Bardot who was often the opposite (!) bright, fun, daring, expressive and wore skirts and dresses with a much higher hem line!

 

swinging sixties

Jackie Kennedy’s 60’s style was demure and classic

 

Swinging sixties

Brigitte Bardot’s bright and beautiful 60’s style.

Sixties fashion was also about a return to youth; large collars, bows, delicate embellishments and trimmings would make women appear younger and smaller whilst oversized, tunic-style dresses would hide a woman’s natural body shape de-emphasising their natural form and capturing the playful, youthful side of the 1960’s fashion. Over half of the American population, at this time, were under 25 years old and a large portion of Europe also had a younger age group and so it made sense that there was such a shift in style from the 1950’s mature fashion. Tight pencil skirts, corset tops and dresses loosened up into the shapeless shift dresses and kitten heels, trainers and Mary Jane strap shoes made a comeback. The baby doll look was also incorporated into hair, makeup and dresses.

swinging sixties

Twiggy wearing a typical 60’s shift dress.

 

swinging sixties

1960’s Jumper Dress

 

The sixties shift dresses were mainly worn for casual purposes; shopping, heading to the beach and running errands. The hem was often worn higher than the knee and was not suitable for the workplace.

 

swinging sixties

Baby doll hair, makeup and dress of the Swinging Sixties.

The swinging sixties was also a time of sexual power through fashion. The length of a woman’s dress or skirt would be a direct indication of her sexual liberation. Short hems were not intended to attract sexual interest but they were a way for a woman to decide what attention she wished to accept.

The artwork and patterns of the early 1960’s were inspired by the art and music movements of that era with bright and bold patterns taking over. It was nigh on impossible to be too over the top! As the 1970’s drew nearer the colours began to warm up and took on more earthly tones.

 

swinging sixties

Just some of our new handbags and boots coming to a Banned Apparel retailer near you.

 

swinging sixties

1960’s inspired collection coming soon to a Banned Apparel retailer near you.

 

swinging sixties

Banned Apparel sixties style jumper dresses, shoes and handbags.

Banned Apparel is a manufacturer of fine vintage inspired clothing, footwear and accessories and, although we may not sell directly to the public, we do have an impressive list of retailers worldwide both online and with physical stores. It is very easy to find your nearest supplier. Simply enter ‘Banned Apparel’ into your search engine for a selection of vintage and also darker inspired pieces.

You can also stay up to date with our latest news, new releases and customer inspired features by following us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Need help? Please feel free to contact us through our social media or via info@bannedapparel.co.uk

 

 

Occult Fashion

The Occult Fashion Movement.

The Occult fashion movement is making a fierce comeback but, unlike the 90’s, it is a lot more subtle, with touches of darkness and Gothic undertones attracting a much wider audience. Today’s Occult fashion features symbols from Ancient Egypt, paganism and witchcraft mixed with the latest street style.

So, what exactly is Occult?

The dictionary defines occult as “hidden, secret and mysterious, particularly pertaining to the supernatural.” Examples of occult practices are astrology, witchcraft (Wicca), the black arts, fortune telling, magic (both black and white), Ouija boards, Tarot cards, spiritualism, parapsychology, and Satanism. Traditional Occult dress is used when participating in ceremonies, rituals, or magic rites. Western occult dress has three primary functions:

1- To psychologically place the wearer in an extraordinary sense of reality;

2 – To identify the status of the wearer within a social group;

3 – To indicate the beliefs of the wearer.

In the late twentieth century, some occultists wishing to be recognized in mainstream religious and cultural arenas adopted stereotypical occult dress – black robes, pentacle jewellery, black hair, and black eye liner. While controversial among occult communities, they visually publicized and communicated occult membership and beliefs by wearing this type of dress.

Occult dress has also influenced subcultures. The dark-romantic Goths, some heavy metal music fans “headbangers,” and a variety of vampire subcultures utilize elements of occult dress, especially stereotypical components, such as black clothing and pentacles. Occult dress styles are more commonly worn by these subcultures as a symbol of subculture affiliation, rather than as an indicator of religious or spiritual beliefs and practices.

Inspiration Behind the Occult Fashion Movement.

Alchemical Symbols;  In order to try and keep track of all their experimentation, alchemists came up with new symbolic ways to represent elements in a shorthand way, using pictographs. These days, some of the symbols are still in use in the scientific fields, but they also show up as a beautiful print on fabrics.

Occult Fashion

Occult Alchemical Symbols

 

Tarot Cards; Tarot cards are experiencing a huge, almost cult-like following. Tarot cards are a form of divination, which literally means working with the divine, or your higher self, which is the ultimate purpose of tarot cards. They are often beautifully illustrated, many with distinct, medieval style artwork. These cards have become iconic over the years due in part to the symbolism of each character but perhaps also to the respect many people have for things just on the line between believable and unreal.

Occult Fashion

Tarot Cards

 

Astrology Symbols; The symbols used to denote a person’s sign, both in Chinese astrology (animals based on your birth year, like Boar and Tiger) and Western astrology (with its roots in Greek astrology and signs like Taurus or Gemini), are common themes on Occult clothing.

 

We have a wide range of occult inspired clothing, footwear and accessories. Check with your local Banned Apparel retailer for availability. Having trouble? Feel free to contact us; info@bannedapparel.co.uk

 

Occult Fashion

Black Cross Cardigan

 

Occult Fashion

Black Pentagram Backpack

 

Occult Fashion

Never Let Down Handbag

 

Occult Fashion

Pentagram Black Leggings

 

Occult Fashion

Skull Pentagram Swimsuit

 

Occult Fashion

Morgana Creepers

The Punk Movement

Origins of the Punk Movement and Subculture.

It is, still to this day, heavily debated as to where and when the Punk movement exactly began. Everyone has their own thoughts and definitions and there are foundation stones found in several places which makes pinpointing the exact origin difficult. It is thought that the Punk movement emerged in the United States in the early 1970’s as an outgrowth of the 1960’s counter cultural, Summer of Love movements. Punks were often working class, scruffy, dirty in clothing and language. Here in England, the Punk movement had political and economic roots. The economy in the United Kingdom was in poor shape, and unemployment rates were at an all-time high. England’s youth were angry, rebellious and out of work. They had strong opinions and a lot of free time.

This is where the beginnings of punk fashion as we know it emerged, and it was all based around the shop; ‘SEX’ founded by Malcolm McClaren and Vivienne Westwood on King’s Road, Chelsea. There they sold all types of revival items but, more importantly, the boutique spurred the fashion scene. It emerged as the ‘anti-fashion’ boutique.

 

The Punk Movement

Photo of SEX boutique and it’s owners, Malcolm McLaren & Vivienne Westwood

Malcolm was also the brainchild behind The Sex Pistols. Unashamedly crude, extremely emotional, and calculated to exhilarate and offend, the Sex Pistols’ music was in direct opposition to the star trappings and complacency that, by the mid-Seventies, had rendered much of rock and roll stagnant. Over the course of their short, roller-coaster existence, the group released a single studio album that changed the course of popular music. While the Sex Pistols were not the first punk rockers (that distinction probably goes to the Stooges), they were the most widely identified with the Punk movement.

Punk music was angry and a celebration of chaos, attempting to break down the barriers between the audience and performers; songs of dole queues, anti royalists sentiments, alienation and exile were often the subject matter. The clothing and hair styles were in direct relation to the swearing, spitting, vomiting, amphetamines, and crude and chaotic music. British punks wore the sense of failure, hopelessness, and disappointment that many young people felt on their bodies for all to see.

The Punk movement

McLaren and Westwood’s ‘God Save The Queen T-shirt’. Two punk staples; distressed and a safety pin.

Westwood and McLaren led the way with zips, pins, studs. badges and tartan, all being used in some way as political statements and rebellion.

With the arrival of the 80’s civil unrest intensified and punk fashion became even more politicised. Slashed t shirts, mohawks, Dr Martens, scrawled slogans, tattoos and studs, is what we all now remember; ‘Street Punk’

The Punk Movement

A fantastic couple wearing their split tartan trousers, badges, pins and slogans.

 

We have a wide range of clothing, footwear and apparel inspired by the punk movement available from Banned Apparel retailers worldwide. If you need help finding your nearest stockist please feel free to contact us; info@bannedapparel.co.uk

The Punk Movement

Red Tartan Handcuff Wallet

 

The Punk Movement

Tartan Messenger Bag – Available in Other Colours.

 

The Punk Movement

Jetsetter Trousers

 

The Punk Movement

Checked Split Skinny Jeans

The Punk Movement

Red Tartan Jacket

 

 

Day of the Dead

History of Day of the Dead and the Sugar Skull Tradition.

The wonderful and most fascinating celebration of the Day of the Dead takes place in central and southern Mexico on the 1st and 2nd of November and is an ancient tradition of celebrating loved ones who have passed away. The indigenous people believe that the gates of heaven are opened at midnight on October 31, and the spirits of all deceased children (angelitos) are allowed to reunite with their families for 24 hours. On November 2nd, the spirits of the adults come down to enjoy the festivities that are prepared for them.  After families clean off and decorate the graves of their loved ones, they stay up all night telling funny stories about those who have passed and socialise with one another.

Assured that the dead would be insulted by mourning or sadness, Dia de los Muertos celebrates the lives of the deceased with food, drink, parties, and activities the dead enjoyed in life. Dia de los Muertos recognizes death as a natural part of the human experience, a continuum with birth, childhood, and growing up to become a contributing member of the community. On Dia de los Muertos, the dead are also a part of the community, awakened from their eternal sleep to share celebrations with their loved ones.

The most familiar symbol of Dia de los Muertos may be the calacas and calaveras (skeletons and skulls), which appear everywhere during the holiday: in candied sweets, as parade masks, as dolls.Calacas and calaveras are almost always portrayed as enjoying life, often in fancy clothes and entertaining situations.

Day of the Dead

This woman artisan is busy decorating her home with candles, copal (aromatic resin), fruits, cempasuchil (wild marigolds), and saint’s images. Later, when the home cooking is done, she’ll bring big plates of food to offer to the spirits of her returning loved ones!

 

Day of the Dead

In some areas, people dance around with shells attached to their clothing. The noise of the shells hitting each other is believed to wake the spirits up.

 

Day of the Dead

Marigold is the important flower used in celebrating the Day of the Dead in Oaxaca and throughout Mexico.
In the remote villages, the people use a wild version of the Marigold. It flowers in October and is plentiful in the fields.
In Oaxaca the indigenous people call the flower Cempasuchitl in the Nahuatl language (Aztec)
The Spanish name for the flower, Flor de muerto, means flower of death.

Day of the Dead

One popular tradition is to make colourful candy made skulls out of sugar. Often they are decorated with the names of the deceased on the forehead of the skull.

 

We love the Day of the Dead traditions, festivities, and everything it stands for, and thought we would incorporate the iconic sugar skulls into our collection. Although we do not sell directly to the public, we do have fantastic retailers worldwide. If you would like some help finding your local Banned Apparel retailer please feel free to contact us; info@bannedapparel.co.uk

 

Day of the Dead

Sugar Skull Cherries Handbag and Purse.

 

Sugar Skull Wedges and Purse. Photo // Our Stockist www.Belldandy.fr

Sugar Skull Wedges and Purse.
     Photo // Our Stockist www.Belldandy.fr

 

Day of the Dead

Sugar Skull Cat Cardigan.

 

Day of the Dead

Sugar Skull Purse.